In November 2013, the APT hosted a group of experts to consider
the practical and legal implications for the sharing and use of torturetainted information by executive agencies. The experts were asked
to consider whether and how standards for the use of information
obtained by torture could be adopted, to guide State behaviour in
complying with international standards.
Among the questions asked, were:
•	 What is the problem with police, security and intelligence
agencies receiving and using torture-tainted information, or
sharing information with States that torture?
•	 How should we respond to the ‘moral dilemma’, whereby rejecting
information could undermine attempts to prevent terrorism?
•	 Does the executive use of torture-tainted information, or sharing
information which leads to torture, violate international law?

ISBN 978-2-940337-65-1	

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BEWARE THE GIFT OF POISON FRUIT  SHARING INFORMATION WITH STATES THAT TORTURE

Torture is an abhorrent practice and absolutely prohibited in inter­
national treaties, custom and in the constitutions of almost every
State. More than a decade since the launch of the war against
terrorism, police, security and intelligence agencies should now
consider what the limits of intelligence cooperation between States
should be, in order to restore the dignity of the absolute prohibition
against torture.

•	

BEWARE THE GIFT
OF POISON FRUIT

	

Sharing information
with States that torture

APT • P.O. Box 137 • 1211 Geneva 19 • Switzerland • www.apt.ch

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